Apps to Help Against Food Waste

November 23rd, 2015

While the holidays are a time to bring family and friends together over big celebrations and meals we also need to be aware of food waste and those that go without.  Unfortunately, 40 percent of all food in the U.S. goes to waste because of excessive portion sizes at restaurants, misinterpretation of expiration dates on packaged foods, and overstocking. Thankfully, food waste can be reduced using what many people already carry in their pockets—their smartphones.

Numerous food waste apps have been created to help consumers throw away less food in their homes with date trackers, educational platforms, and recipe generators. Additionally, restaurants, grocery stores, and other food businesses can use the apps to donate food they can no longer sell.

This Thanksgiving, consider trying a new smartphone app to help your family reduce food waste. Here are 14 notable apps worth trying, courtesy of FoodTank (focused on building a global community for safe, healthy, nourished eaters):

1. AmpleHarvest: now allows farmers and gardeners to connect with food pantries through an iPhone app. The platform allows users to donate the abundance of their harvest to those in need.

2. Green Egg Shopper: In addition to tracking expiration dates on purchased food items,Green Egg Shopper also provides a tracker for coupons, vouchers, and overall food expenditures.

3. Feeding Forward: Californian businesses and farms can donate their excess product with Feeding Forward, which allows individuals to donate surplus food from their homes. Anyone wishing to give excess food can post the donation on the app or on the online website, and then allow a driver to pick up and deliver the food to a nearby shelter in need. Feeding Forward even allows users to track their impact by viewing profiles of the organizations and individuals who receive their donations.

4. Flash Food: In Arizona, FlashFood connects food service institutions to food recovery organizations and local community centers with a network of volunteers.

5. Food Cowboy: Food Cowboy works at the distribution level to redistribute rejected deliveries from wholesalers and restaurants to food banks and soup kitchens. Event hosts and caterers can use the app to request pickup of leftovers, and charities can use the platform to source larger donations.

6. FoodKeeper: The USDA voice-controlled FoodKeeper app provides storage method tips to extend shelf life, cooking tips for meat and seafood products, and sends expiration reminders to consumers. Additionally, the app contains a feature called Ask Karen that allows users to submit questions to its 24/7 virtual representative that can answer questions about cooking, storage, and food-borne illnesses.

7. FridgePal: Oftentimes, consumers throw away their groceries due to expiration dates. But FridgePal tracks the expiration dates of food items and offers consumer shopping lists, recipes searchable by lists of ingredients, and a meal planner. The app visually separates food contained in refrigerators, freezers, and pantries. It also gives cooks the option of viewing items by type, such as dairy, meals and leftovers, or sauces.

8. LeftoverSwap: Users of LeftoverSwap can snap a picture of their uneaten food and arrange for pickup with other community members who are interested in their leftovers.

9. PareUp: PareUp allows consumers in New York City to purchase unsold food at a discount from a number of various retailers, who in turn increase their revenues by selling food that normally would have been thrown away at the end of the business day.

10. Reta: Reta sends users timely reminders on their phones, allowing them to see all of their food at home from any location to plan their meals at any time. The feature is also useful while shopping for groceries to avoid overbuying. And Reta tracks how much users eat, allowing them to see lifetime statistics of what percentage of food goes uneaten.

11. Spoiler Alert: Spoiler Alert allows food distributors to donate surplus product to charities in Boston, MA. “We offer a secondary market for discounted food sales, which enables new revenue streams, and streamline and simplify the documentation for tax benefits, which are quite sizable,” says co-founder Emily Malina.

12. Still Tasty: Knowing how to store various food items can help anyone keep their food fresh longer. Still Tasty will also provide expiration date reminders while also giving users access to a detailed database containing hundreds of food items. The resource takes many variables into account, such as if the item’s store-bought or homemade, open or unopened, and packaging type, giving storage tips accordingly.

13. Waste No Food: Waste No Food is a nonprofit platform created by Kiran Sridhar, a high school student in the San Francisco Bay Area. The app connects farms, restaurants, cafeterias, and grocery stores with local groups that need donations, and has helped to save over 10,000 pounds of food.

14. Zero Percent: Chicago’s retailers with excess food can use the Zero Percent app to post available donations in real time. “Zero Percent is a food rescue platform, not just an app, that solves the problem of matching and moving excess prepared and perishable food between businesses and local nonprofits in a reliable and safe way,” says Raj Karmani, founder. “The platform coordinates the rescue of nearly 2,500 pounds a day without owning any vehicle or warehouse. Zero Percent will hit its millionth pound this holiday season.”


Tis the Season – Eat More Pumpkin with Banana Pumpkin Muffins

October 26th, 2015


My family loves all the seasonal food this time of year.  We buy enough pumpkin butter, canned pumpkin, nutmeg, cinnamon and molasses to keep us going throughout the fall and then some.   Halloween may seem to be all about candy, but for me it’s all about pumpkin and the various ways we can incorporate it into our fall meals.  And why not?  According to this article in the Huffington Post pumpkin is healthy and helps our eyesight, mood and waistlines, while also protecting our hearts, immune system and skin.


I noticed some too ripe bananas on my counter and immediately thought of making banana bread or muffins, but how about banana pumpkin?  I switched the applesauce in my banana apple muffins with pumpkin and it was a big hit.  Banana and pumpkin is a great combo.  It was perfect for the kids’  weekend sleep over as well as snack after a soccer game.  Here’s the recipe.


Banana Pumpkin Muffins

(Makes 12)

1 1/2 cup organic wheat pastry flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

½ teaspoon salt

½ cup sweet cream butter, (1 stick)

¾ cup canned pumpkin

2 medium ripe bananas

½ cup organic light brown sugar

2 cage-free, organic eggs

sprinkle of cinnamon


Preheat oven to 375F. With a fork, combine flour, soda and salt in a small mixing bowl.

Melt butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Or melt butter in microwave for 25 seconds on high.

In a large bowl combine melted butter, pumpkin, mashed banana, sugar and eggs. Mix together with a rubber spatula. Add flour mixture to pumpkin mixture and stir until just blended. Batter will be lumpy and very moist.

Spoon batter into greased muffin tin cups 2/3 full and sprinkle with cinnamon if desired. Bake for 10 – 12 minutes or until golden brown and set. Remove pan from oven and cool on a rack 5 minutes, before turning out muffins.




It’s All in the Wrists – Massage Your Kale!

October 9th, 2015


It’s on restaurant menus, snack advertisements and at your local farmer’s market.  You hear everywhere that you should should be eating more kale.  It is considered one of life’s most nutritious foods, packed with vitamins C and K plus calcium, fiber and antioxidants. I love kale but many do not.  While it can be bitter and that’s why some disguise it with fruits in smoothies or eat it in bags baked with cheese and chili flavor – I don’t think the taste is the problem.  It’s the texture.  Especially if you have it raw in a salad.  There are too many times when I order a kale salad in a restaurant and it is almost inedible because it is just too rough and I’m afraid I’ll choke or stab myself.  Also if it’s too wilted and I find myself chewing forever.






dino or lacinto

There are a few varieties of kale.  There’s lacinto or dinosaur kale while has very wide, flat, dark green leaves that are bumpy (far right).  There’s red kale with dark red stems and green leaves (center).  Then most popular is curly kale which is brighter green and more curly and spiky(left).  Thus a problem for raw salads if not prepared properly.  So the magic to prepping raw kale for a salad is…..wait for it…..the massage.  Yes.  You must massage the kale Leaves (after removing stems) in some fresh lemon juice and/or salt.  And this isn’t a little light pressure stir with some tongs.  This is a 3 – 5 minute deep tissue massage with your hands.  It makes all the difference in the world to being able to enjoy and chew the kale.  Here’s an adapted recipe we make at my house for a favorite kale salad from Picture Cook: See. Make. Eat. by Katie Shelly.  This book if fun because it’s all pictures and no instruction (but you kind of have to have some kitchen and cooking knowledge).  I use this preparation anytime I’m using raw kale.  However you an substitute dressings and veggies.  This is a great asian dressing that marries the sweet apples and spicy ginger and onion.


Chelsea’s Kale Salad

1 bunch kale, stems removed

1/2 lemon – squeezed

1 avocado, diced

1 apple, peeled and chopped into squares

1/2 cup almonds (optional)

a few slices of red onion (optional)


2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger

1 tablespoon tamari or soy sauce

1/2 tablespoon olive oil

In a large bowl tear kale leaves into bite sized pieces.  Squeeze lemon juice over kale and massage with your hands for about 3 minutes until kale is pliable and not sharp.  Add avocado and mash with your hands to incorporate.

Prepare dressing in a small jar and shake to combine.

Add apples, nuts and onions to kale.  Drizzle with dressing and toss everything together.


Summer of Pop – Cool Popsicle Ideas and Recipe

September 10th, 2015



My kids are usually big on making ice cream in the summer.  We certainly did make and eat some.  However this year at our house it seems to be the popsicle which took center stage for recipe experimentation and overall cool treat winner.  My daughter and her friend Emily, even set up a popsicle stand after experimenting for 2 days with flavors.  Watermelon, mango and strawberry were big hits while peach, raspberry and pineapple not as sweet.  It was actually less about the flavor than the texture.  The girls’ popsicles were nothing but fruit.  No sugar or anything added.  Just take fresh fruit, blend in a blender and pour into a popsicle mold.  That’s it!  This also meant no one would worry about gluten, dairy or nut allergies.  There was discussion and tests about water and they figured our about dilution and flavor vs quantity.  There was also a discovery that fruit should be ripe.  Under ripe fruit meant bland popsicles.


You have to give them credit…spending all day blending and freezing (of to be patient) and sign making, they still wanted to then go out and sell.  Here’s where the tricky part came and the logistics of a popsicle stand vs other non frozen edibles.  We thought ahead and used popsicle sticks and straws for sticks so people wouldn’t have to give back the reusable popsicle tops (or I wouldn’t loose them).  We carefully loosened the popsicles, set them back in the trays and carefully placed them in an ice chest with ice packs.  But how long would this last?  Well when opening and closing an ice chest full of frozen popsicles on an 85 degree day at the park the answer is about 30 – 40 minutes before they turn to slush.  Thankfully Emily’s mom to the rescue with a stop at the store to pick up cups.  They then rebooted the popsicles to “new fruit slushies” and ventured to another park to sell. Certainly their popsicle stand wasn’t as big of a draw as their past bake and lemonade stand sales, but you never know what they’ll create next.



Not over the love of popsicles (or our crazy 90 degree heat), I decided to use some left-over canned coconut milk and create my own popsicle as a surprise for my kids finishing the first week of school.  I made sushi for dinner and then these were the perfect dessert pop to finish the hot evening.  I was inspiredly by a coconut popsicle recipe from Don’t Waste The Crumbs .  I changed mine to all coconut milk (vs mix with cream), reduced the maple syrup, omitted the fresh coconut flakes (my kids wouldn’t have wanted the hairy texture) and increased the recipe for a bigger pop mold.  Next time I’ll check my chocolate stash before freezing as the use of chocolate fudge sauce didn’t give my popsicles the hard chocolate coating I was hoping for.  However there were no complaints.

Coconut Chocolate Popsicles

(makes 4, 3 oz. popsicles)

  • 12 oz light coconut milk
  • 4 Tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2  tsp vanilla extract
  • pinch of sea salt
  • 3 oz dark chocolate for coating, less if drizzling
  • ½ tsp coconut oil
  • pinch of sea salt
  1. Combine coconut, syrup and vanilla in a mixing bowl. Add a pinch of sea salt, or more to taste.
  2. Ladle or pour the mixture into popsicle molds and freeze for a few hours, or until set.
  3. Prepare the chocolate “shell” coating by melting chocolate and coconut oil in a small sauce pot over low heat, stirring constantly until just melted.  Or melt in the microwave for 15 second intervals, stirring between each. (This is where I used fudge sauce and although tasty it don’t set in the freezer).  Once melted, remove from heat immediately and stir in a pinch of salt.
  4. When pops are frozen, remove from molds and place on a cookie sheet or plate lined with wax paper. Place pops in the freezer.
  5. Removing one pop at a time, use a small ladle or spoon to drizzle or pour the chocolate over the pop. Quickly transfer the pop back to the lined board in the freezer. Can sprinkle with additional flaked coconut if desired.
  6. Repeat until all pops are coated and in the freezer to set.
  7. Store pops in freezer until ready to eat (cover if storing longer than a few hours).

Rafting Vacation – Amazing and Efficient Cooking

September 3rd, 2015


My family was lucky enough to take a trip to Oregon this summer.  It was a blast.  There were 3 generations of my family on a 3 day white water rafting and camping trip on the Deschutes River.  My kids and my parents had been planning and preparing for weeks and months before.  We were all so looking forward and we were not disappointed.  Of course we all knew the rafting and rapids would be fun.  But none of us really thought much about the camping and land portion of the trip.  We knew we were going to have fantastic guides at (we’d been on a one day trip before) but we did not know the lengths they would go to keep us happy, safe and well fed.

river kitchenriver kitchen 2








Which brings me to the food.  I sometimes complain to myself that I don’t have access to a piece of kitchen equipment or there is a missing pan.  I won’t again.  The guides on the rafting trip set up amazingly efficient “kitchens” that created wonderful meals.  Also I must remind you we are not an easy group to cook for, given our dietary and health restrictions – everything from my 9 year old being a vegetarian to my sister being vegan to my step dad needing to avoid too much salt and sugar.  Of course there’s lactose intolerance and beef issues sprinkled in the crowd too.

The food was amazing.  Plus they did it all breakfast, lunch and dinner for 3 days.  We offered assistance but they turned down our offer and told us to relax (the wine helped too).  I was thinking typical camping/outdoor fare such as hot dogs and veggie burgers but this wasn’t the case at all.  I was so tired, hungry and wet that I didn’t get a photo of the appetizers of marinated olives, hummus and veggies, that greeted us at the camp when we docked.  Here are photos of the first night’s dinner –  grilled local salmon, spinach salad, ratattouille and quinoa.  Followed by dessert of chocolate fondue.

grilled salmon

saladratattouillechocolate fondue





I’m sorry my camera batteries went dead after the first night.  So many beautiful scenes of Orgeon and family.  I could’ve taken more photos of the lovely breakfast offerings of blueberry pancakes, yogurt and fruit and bacon.  Or the lunch of camp made falafel wrapped with veggies in flatbread with homemade yogurt dressing.

What I really learned was how efficient you could be with proper prep and shopping and just the essentials.  If I didn’t know this from cooking demos in other people’s kitchens, and meeting people living in SRO’s (single resident occupants) without kitchens, I know it now.  There was no running water, except the river.  There was no conventional stove (a butane burner and grill did the trick).  There was no refrigerator.  And let’s not forget, all the equipment and food was all packed on a raft that had to go down class 2, 3 and 4 rapids.  And did I mention the crazy wind one night and keeping the food bee free?

Besides being great cooks, the guides were also great diners and slipped quite easily into our family conversations.  We were sad to say goodbye.  My kids both said it was the greatest thing they’ve ever done.  In fact they both wrote on their first back to school assignments, that wanted to become rafting guides.  It was truly an inspirational trip.  Looks like they’ll be lots more rafting, (and cooking) in our family’s future.

Thank you Nan and Poppa!


Boston Cream Pie Birthday

August 24th, 2015











This year my son was turning 12 and his request for a dessert was a Boston Cream Pie.  I thought it was kind of out there and not sure he had tasted one before but his sister and I were ready to oblige.  Of course since his b-day is in the summer it’s always a very busy day and when you factor in all the other things such as camp drop shuttling and family in town there never seems to be enough time for a scratch b-day cake… especially a Boston Cream Pie.  Also I’m not sure why it’s called a pie.  It is clearly a cake.


Thankfully I found a recipe that makes the cake with a few shortcuts.  I would usually avoid a birthday cake mix at all costs, however I found an organic, all natural mix by Immaculate Baking Company (no chemicals, additives, GMO’s) at Whole Foods.  That wasn’t my only shortcut however.  No time to do the scratch cream this recipe calls for vanilla pudding.  Believe it or not my son hasn’t had vanilla pudding.  Funny, but pudding just doesn’t seem to come up the way it did in the 70’s in my childhood.  It also means since he’s not a big Boston Cream Pie connoisseur, the pudding would certainly suffice and be yummy and new to him.

My daughter and I had a great time making and assembling the layers.  We did use high quality dark chocolate for the frosting.  No need to short cut there.  And I must say it was pretty impressive looking, and very tasty.

Funny thing was my son didn’t recognize it as what he had asked for.  When he saw it he said “Wow, that looks great.  What kind of cake is that?”  Huh?  Apparently after some discussion what he was really wanting was a chocolate cream pie, as in a true pie with a crust and chocolate meringue.  Of well.  Now he has another new favorite dessert to add to his repertoire and now we’ll have to make a chocolate cream pie so he realizes the difference.

Here’s the Recipe I found and made from Taste of

Boston Cream Pie

TOTAL TIME: Prep: 10 min. + cooling Bake: 30 min.
MAKES: 6-8 servings


  • 1 package yellow cake mix (regular size)
  • 1-1/2 cups cold milk
  • 1 package (3.4 ounces) instant vanilla pudding mix
  • 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons hot water


  1. Prepare cake mix batter according to package directions. Pour into two greased and floured 9-in. round baking pans.
  2. Bake at 350° for 28-33 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes before removing cake from pans to wire racks to cool completely.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk milk and pudding mix for 2 minutes. Let stand for 2 minutes or until soft-set. Cover and refrigerate.
  4. In a microwave, melt chocolate and butter; stir until smooth. Stir in confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and enough water to achieve a thick glaze; set aside.
  5. Place one cake layer on a serving plate; spread with pudding. Top with the second cake layer. Spoon chocolate glaze over the top, allowing it to drip down sides of cake. Refrigerate until serving.  




Amazing Race Party and Food Challenges

July 24th, 2015


My family loves watching the Amazing Race.  The kids love to see all the crazy antics and challenges.  I love seeing all the settings and cultures from around the world.  And we all route for our favorite teams.  It’s kind of a life lesson in geography and anthropology all wrapped into one.  Showing the kids how people stick together and cooperate as well as how poor sportsmanship can bring down the team.

This year my daughter wanted an Amazing Race birthday party.  Since she wanted to participate I came up with the challenge and clues for her and her friends.  This was actually pretty fun and creative.  There was a dress up race around the park, a backyard obstacle course, a geography word scramble, just to name a few.  Of course I had to have some foodie challenges as well.











We actually begun at a favorite local juice shop, Juice Girl where the girls had to drink a juice and smoothie and determine all the ingredients before getting their next clue.  There was a travel to China challenge where the girls used their chopsticks skills.  Finally I put them to work with a race to make lemonade (the old fashioned way – nothing electric), as well as cupcake decorating (using candy they collected at a yogurt shop contest).  This was good idea as not only were they making things quickly but they would also be careful and make them tasty as they would be drinking the lemonade with their lunch, and eating the cupcakes after.


My daughter and her friends had a great time.  With all the challenges we kept 8, 9 year olds busy forabout 2.5 hours both at home and around town.  The challenges took some organizing (making simple syrup, gathering chopsticks) but really made use of things we already had at home (dress up clothes, obstacle items) and didn’t require buying much (bag of lemons, juices, smoothies).  We decided we’re going to do smaller get togethers and challenges more regularly, while we’re waiting for the show to start again.


Think Outside the Oven – Microwave and Toaster Cookies

May 20th, 2015


So my oven went out for about a week.  At first this was no big deal, I can certainly cook on the stove.  The oven wouldn’t be repaired for a few days and I made soups, chili, quesadillas, crepes, etc.  My family was eating no problem and didn’t give the oven a thought until I was to make sweets for the school garden fair.


I forgot about the oven and even thawed out my homemade cookie dough I had (always have) to make some quick and easy chocolate chip cookies to go with some brownies I was also going to bake and bring to the fair.  Then I went to turn on the oven and remembered.



I didn’t want to waste my homemade dough and decided to experiment with other ways to cook it.  First I lined my toaster oven with parchment and tried to bake.  It worked!  I set the toaster on bake and it took longer than the oven, maybe 15 minutes.  But the pan is so small, the cookies were small and I couldn’t make too many at a time.  They did kind of spread together, but hey, they cooked well and were tasty!  Since they didn’t look as nice and round as usual I decided they wouldn’t be going to the fair.  However I was pleased I wouldn’t be wasting the dough.  Since I was now making these to eat for my family I wanted to try another cooking method…Yes, the microwave.  I try to control myself from experimenting with the microwave too much. Remember my post to popcorn where I started a fire while trying to pop corn in a bag?


I looked online and others had tried baking cookies in a microwave too. I experimented with a plate vs a ramekin.  Ramekin was better.  I tried different cooking times so the cookie would be cooked through vs just hot dough.  What I came up with was pretty good.

The cookie became more like a cake.  I dropped a heaping tablespoon full of dough into a ramekin and cooked on high for 35 seconds.

cookie cake

I let it sit to cool a bit and it became less doughy and more cake like.  I was really excited to show my kids and loved how we could have individual servings of fresh hot cookie cakes so quickly and easily.  We even ate the warm cookie cake with ice cream on top.  Yum!


As for what I made for the garden fair…I went to the store and bought Rice Krispies and marshmallows for a few batches of Rice Krispies Treats.  I followed the stove top recipe on the box and added 3/4 cups of white chocolate so it was a little “out of the box” and we took them to the fair.  Although my stove is fixed we still make the cookie cakes on occasion.  Another excuse always to have homemade cookie dough on hand.

melting marshmallow





Easter Evolution and the Pollan Family Salad

April 2nd, 2015






One of my favorite Easter activities is egg dying.  So that will certainly happen.  And although I like to do the natural dyes (see past blog for recipes and photo on right), we’ll likely do some not so natural too (photo on left).  This is an area as my kids get older that they like to experience both the organic, healthy way and the colorful less eco friendly way as well.  I figure the majority of our days we practice an eco friendly lifestyle of eating mostly healthy organic foods, reducing our meat intake, limiting processed foods and recycling, but sometimes the holidays have to have some leeway.  The chemical dyes are one way I’m giving in.


My other give in is a Cadbury egg (my teeth ache just thinking about it).  My son is 11 and has never had one and is curious (ok, begging) to try one.  So in his Easter basket of rabbit glasses, a book, recycle “grass” and sugar free jelly beans will also be his surprise egg.  My daughter’s basket will also include real eggs from the chicken’s down the street.  Since she’s discovered the egg box in our neighborhood that shares eggs from adopted chickens, she’s enamored (and only wants to eat those – not store bought).


I’m not hosting Easter this year but were going to spend the afternoon with family.  There will be a festive egg hunt, followed by early supper.  It’s all ages (from 1 – 70+) so there’s lots of land mines when planning dinner.  I’ve been asked to bring a salad.  At first I was thinking it should be “special” and “holiday worthy” but then I came across this lovely and simple one from Michael Pollan, which is sure to please all diets and tastes (I’ll likely serve my cheese and nuts on the side).  I figure if it’s good enough for his family, it’s good for mine too.  (Although I still may add some edible flowers).


Pollan Signature Salad
6 servings

We serve this salad at all our large family gatherings. Light, crisp, both vinegary and sweet, our signature salad is a delicious addition to any meal.

For the dressing:
1/3 cup white balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon raspberry vinegar, champagne vinegar, or sherry vinegar
1½ teaspoons Dijon mustard
1/3 cup grapeseed oil
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

For the salad:

5 to 7 ounces mesclun or mixed baby greens
½ cup chopped, toasted walnuts
½ Bosc pear (cut lengthwise), cored, and thinly sliced
1/3 cup shaved Parmesan cheese

For the dressing: In a glass jar with a lid or in a small mixing bowl, combine the vinegars, mustard, grapeseed oil, olive oil, 1/8 teaspoon of salt, and pepper to taste. Shake the jar vigorously or whisk in the bowl to emulsify.

For the salad: Place the mesclun in a large salad bowl. Pour on half the dressing and toss the greens to coat. Add the walnuts, pear, and more dressing to taste (taking care not to overdress) and toss again. Top with the Parmesan cheese shavings and serve.

Food for thought: Walnuts are the healthiest tree nuts around—they have close to twice as much antioxidants as other nuts! What’s more, they are an excellent source of essential omega-3 fatty acids, which is great news for people who don’t eat heart-healthy fish.


Happy St. Patricks’ Day – Corned Beef, Cabbage and Soda Bread

March 17th, 2015


My family got a jump on St. Patrick’s Day this year and I made our Irish feast on Sunday.  With all the kids’ activities I wasn’t sure I could do the holiday justice on a Tuesday night.  Last year I didn’t make corned beef because my son and I are the only ones that eat it.  I wasn’t going to miss it again this year, so I bought corned beef by the pound at Whole Foods rather than having to buy a whole pre-packaged brisket.  1, 1/4 pounds was perfect for our St. Pat’s meal plus another night of left-overs.  I also bought for the non-beef eater and vegetarian, aka my husband and daughter a small Field Roast grain loaf.  It actually paired quite well with my cabbage with apples (see below) and roasted potatoes and carrots.


IMG_1839 IMG_1837 IMG_1841

My daughter had also asked about Soda Bread after hearing about it on a radio commercial, so we made that as well.  I found a different recipe other than my own that called for buttermilk and all purpose flour.  This one also had raisins but my kids said “no” to those.  It came out good.  Big and dense, but not as dense as my wheat version.  The left-overs are really yummy dipped in soup too.  Here’s the recipe from  It was pretty quick and easy.


the real corned beef

the real corned beef


I don’t like corned beef that’s falling apart and grey.  And I don’t have hours to cook it all day.  If you’re getting good corned beef from the butcher you should cook it so it actually has some flavor.  Here’s what I do… (note this is for a ledger piece of meet my

Corned Beef

1 1/4 pound piece only cooked about 45 minutes)

4 lb. corned beef brisket (brined from the butcher)

2 tablespoons honey

2 tablespoons dijon mustard

Mix the mustard and honey together.  Use it to coat the meat.  Go right over the black peppercorns and other seasonings on the meat (of if you have a spice packet, mix with mustard).

Place meat on rack over roasting pan with 1/2 cup water in bottom of pan.

Roast approximately 2 hours or until thermometer reads 150F.

cabbage and apples

with Cabbage and Apples

I usually do this with purple cabbage because I think it has more flavor but this year my daughter wanted green.  It was still good.

1 – 2 tablespoons olive oil

1/2 onion, sliced

1 head cabbage, sliced and shredded

2 apples, peeled and sliced

1/3 cup vegetable broth

3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

In a large saucepan heat oil over medium heat.  Add onions and sauté about 5 minutes.  Add cabbage and apples, stirring to combine.  Add broth.  Once cabbage and apples are cooked and wilted, about 7 – 10 minutes add in vinegar and salt and pepper.