Kids’ Menus – A Few Good, Most Not So

I am usually dissappointed by kids’ menus at restaurants.  Why is it that the restaurant can serve fresh, organic, delicious food on the adult menu, but the the kids’ is an afterthought with a choice of who’s who from the freezer section?  Why offer a kids menu at all if you’re stooping to offer a steamed hot dog and boxed macaroni and cheese?  When did people get the idea that kids will only eat hot dogs, hamburgers, pasta with butter and chicken strips?  And even if the kids’ menu is decent, why does everything have to come with fries?  If your restaurant makes pasta for adults, make pasta for kids (just not such an overwhelming size).  If my family is going to a mexican restaurant we’ve decided we want mexican food, not a burger and fries.  If you have salads for adults, why not a small salad or some fresh, raw veggies for the younger set?  And what about milk?  Some kids are only offered soda, juice and chocolate milk.

 

Seems easier to use same ingredients and cooking techniques too.   I rarely offer my kids what’s on these menus other than the games and pictures to draw (although harder to edit now that my son reads).  We prefer to order a smaller or shared portion from the main or appetizer menu.  Or we pay for two adult size portions and take food home.

 

OK…Enough of my ranting.

 

I was impressed on two recent occassions when dining out with my family.  First, we went to  San Luis Obispo where we had a lovely breakfast at Big Sky Cafe.  The kids’ menu did have a drawing to color but the offerings were actually made from the same fresh organic ingredients as the regular menu, just smaller portions.  A stack of blueberry pancakes just wasn’t stacked so high.  A make your own omelet only came with 2 eggs and the steel cut oatmeal was appealing for every age with a selection of dried fruit and fresh berries.  I wish we were staying for lunch and dinner too.  Anyone for a petit filet with potato croquettes?   Mind you this was not a high end restaurant, as everything was under $18 for dinner on the main menu, under $10 on the kids’ menu.

 

Another great local find with a good kids’ menu is Piatti Ristorante.  There are 9 locations in all – most in California, but also in Colorado, Washington and  Texas.  This is a good italian trattoria for family and friends to gather as well as a date night spot when the kids are at home with a sitter.  Each location’s menu reflects the local taste and season.  Their bambini menu is the largest I’ve ever seen with a selection of antipasti, pizza, primi (pasta), secondi (salmon, chicken, steak), verdure (broccoli, mixed veggies) and dolce (gelato, panna cotta).  They started with an antipasti of salami, mozzarella, veggies and olives (so much we brought some home). My daughter loved her spinach and cheese ravioli as did my son appreciate his tomato gnocci.  This was higher end for the main menu but everything on the bambini  menu was a bargain at  less than $10.

 

So, yes.  It can be done.  Any place you care to share with a good children’s menu?

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Reward Offered….Missing Sugar Baby (Mardi Gras Wrap Up)

Last night we did our final mardi gras meal and king cake for the season.  There was much build up after all the recipe testing and fanfare.  I even found these fun mardi gras masks.

After reading an article recently from the SF Chronicle about grits making a comeback in restaurants, I thought I’d try their Shrimp and Grits with Tomato-Bacon Relish for Fat Tuesday dinner.  This was great and did not dissappoint.  I wasn’t able to find yellow grits, so I made white.  I only used half the amount of Tabasco and substituted smoked red pepper powder for the cayenne in the shrimp, as my kids are not always excited about too much spice.  I ended up deconstructing theirs (shrimp without sauce, and grits on the side), as the sauce was still a bit hot for my daughter.  But they really loved the meal, especially the grits with cheddar cheese.  I will make this again and would even make it for guests as it was easy and very pretty, besides tasty.  (See entire recipe below)

The moment everyone was waiting for was the king cake.  I decided I had made the cresent version and the cupcake version and was time to try and compare a traditional version of someone else’s.  And sometimes I have to remind myself that I can’t make everything, all the time.  It was difficult to find a local king cake, but I  called around and ordered one from Arizmendi Bakery in San Rafael.  They were making them for Fat Tuesday only.  This was a good option because while it was still large it wasn’t giant like many of those online and most of the recipes (makes 2 cakes to serve 12 – 18 people).  This was mid-week, after school, Tae Kwon Do and doctor’s appointments, so I would be able to squeeze in a cake pick-up but not a make from scratch cake.

My first impression was “This is lovely and very reasonable at $15.”  While it had all the mardi gras colors, it was somehow not as tacky as many pictured online.  Plus everything from Arizmendi (pizzas, scones, muffins etc) is wonderful.  After out great dinner it was time to cut the cake.  I explained to my family what the baker had told me about the “baby”, and that it was “a baby made out of sugar”.  We were so anxious to see the sugar baby.  We each chose a piece and took a bite.  My next thought was “This cake is great”.  Sweet frosting on top of wonderful layers of brioch.  We found the occassional hole that we thought the baby was hiding, but no.  We only ate about 1/4 of the cake and no one found the baby.  My kids and I were very curious.  We decided to cut the remaining cake into slices. 

Still no baby.  We were still hopeful and not yet ready to wreck the yummy cake.  We waited…

Overnight.  Again after dinner, we each chose a slice.  No baby was found.  It was time to butcher the cake.  We cut the remaining slices into small pieces and we never did find the sugar baby.  However we did find a hole with about 1/8 teaspoon sugar.  Was this once the baby?  Did he melt?  Or was this just another sweet bite and the baby made an escape before baking?  We’ll never know.  This baby didn’t bring us luck, but lots of intrigue. 

Shrimp & Grits With Tomato-Bacon Relish

Serves 4

 From Brenda Vuenviaje, chef-owner of Brenda’s French Soul Food cafe in San Francisco. Prepare the grits – which should be soft and spoonable – with 4 parts salted water and 1 part grits.

  • Tomato-Bacon Relish
  • 1/4 pound smoked bacon
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 medium red onion, about 1/2 cup
  • 4 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 cup diced tomatoes, some juice reserved
  • 1 1/2 to 2 teaspoons hot sauce like Tabasco or Crystal, to taste
  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon dark brown sugar, or to taste
  • 3/4 teaspoon sherry vinegar, or to taste
  • — Kosher salt and pepper, to taste
  • Shrimp & Grits
  • 2 cups prepared grits (Bob’s Red Mill yellow grits preferred)
  • 1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese, about 2 ounces
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 pound large shrimp, 26-30 count, peeled and deveined, tails on
  • — Kosher salt, to taste
  • — Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • — Cayenne pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  • — Thinly sliced green onion, for garnish

For the relish: Thinly cut bacon crosswise into lardons about 1/4-inch thick. Cook bacon in a medium-size skillet over medium heat until crispy and fat has rendered. Move bacon to paper towels and reserve. Drain skillet and discard excess fat, while wiping away any burned bits. Add olive oil, onion and garlic. Cook – stirring frequently – until onion is a medium brown color, about three minutes.

Add tomatoes, hot sauce, brown sugar and sherry vinegar then bring to a simmer. Cook briefly until slightly thick, stir in bacon and add salt and pepper to taste. The relish can be made a day or two ahead and kept refrigerated. Makes about 1 cup.

For the shrimp & grits: Preheat oven to 350°. Portion hot grits into 4 large, oven-proof dinner bowls, sprinkle cheddar over and place in oven until melted, about 3 to 5 minutes. Or melt in the microwave, about 30 to 60 seconds per bowl.

Meanwhile, add 2 tablespoons oil to a hot saute pan over medium-high heat. Add garlic and saute briefly until slightly brown. Add shrimp then season with salt, black pepper and cayenne to taste. Saute briefly until edges of shrimp start to turn pink.

Add 1 cup white wine, deglaze pan and cook until wine is reduced by half. Add the Tomato-Bacon Relish and 2 to 3 tablespoons butter. Cook for another minute until sauce is hot and slightly thickened and shrimp are cooked through.

Divide shrimp and sauce into the bowls and garnish with sliced scallion.

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Dad’s Magic Chicken

My 4 1/2 year old hasn’t eaten chicken in 4 or 5 months.  She says she doesn’t like the flavor, although I think it’s more a texture thing.  She didn’t eat much turkey at Thanksgiving either.  Or maybe it’s because she adores her aunt, who is vegan.  She loves to ask “Can TT (Aunt Christy) eat ______?”  The other day is was “Can TT eat snow?”  Although when she says she’s vegan like her aunt, her brother is quick to remind her of all the lamb with mint jelly she likes to eat.

As you probably imagine, I do most of the cooking at our house.  Although my husband does most breakfasts (including weekend pancakes and waffles) and all outdoor cooking.  When the weather is nice you’ll find me inside as sous chef:  making side dishes and prepping veggies and meats for my husband to grill outside.  However sometimes my husband doesn’t wait for the weather to turn warm.  Last weekend he decided to make a new recipe for chicken from the How to Grill Cookbook.   We tried to remember the last time he made a new recipe from a book or even cracked this book (he’s had it about 7 or 8 years).  I was poking fun of him and told the kids he was making “Magic Chicken”.  It got them excited and it was such a hit, my daughter not only tried and loved it, but asked for more.  So much for her vegan ways (this week).  There’s always a tinge of jealousy from mom when dad comes in and makes a great meal (once a month) and gets lots of kudos.  (My son even said “This is the best chicken I’ve ever had!”).  I must admit it really was good.  Now I’m trying to come up with a “mom’s magic” something recipe to compete.  Or maybe I’ll step aside more meals, and suggest dad make more magic.

Dad’s Magic Chicken Marinade

(aka Chicken with Walnut Dill Pesto from How to Grill by Steven Raichlen)

makes enough for 6 – 8 pounds of chicken

1 bunch fresh dill, washed stemmed and chopped

1 bunch basil, washed, stemmed and chopped

5 cloves garlic, chopped

1/2 cup walnut pieces

1/2 cup freshly grated romano cheese

2 strips lemon zest (1/2 by 2 inches)

1 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup lemon juice

1 teaspoon each coarse salt and black pepper, or more to taste

Place the dill, basil, garlic, walnut, cheese, and zest in food processor and process until very finely chopped.  With the machine running add the oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and 3/4 cup water.  Taste for seasoning (it should be highly seasoned). 

Marinate chicken for 2 hours or up to 12 hours, turning once or twice.  The longer the chicken marinates the richer the flavor.  Grill or cook marinated chicken as desired.

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Cookbook Review- Simply Suppers by Jennifer Chandler

I’ve received a great many cookbooks lately.  Some good and some not so good.  Because I believe in the adage “If you can’t say something nice, don;t say anything at all”:  I am not going to share, trash and criticize books I don’t like.  I’m going to tell you about those I used and liked.  Of course there will be pros and cons (nothing is perfect).

Cookbooks are a perfect holiday gift for a home cook and food lover.  You can never have too many (although I’m sure my husband thinks so) and there’s always room for something new and surprising in your collection.  I have a core 8 or 10 books that I use most often, however I have about another 50 that I use maybe one favorite recipe or I pull out when need something fresh or a new inspiration.

Simply Suppers: Comfort Food You Can Get on the Table in No Time Flat by Jennifer Chandler is a great book for busy people who want to make dinner, but don’t have much extra time to shop or cook.  All ingredients are easy to find and the recipes are straight forward and many of them can be made in about a half hour.  There’s some good weeknight options which I made, such as Sloppy Joe’s (which was my family’s favorite) as well as Sauteed Spaghetti Squash and Lemon Salmon.  The recipes are basic and comforting.

Pro: Helpful recipe icons with cooking, freezing and variation tips

Con:  Good solid food, but lack of surprises

Sauteed Spaghetti Squash
Lemon Salmon
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The Dish on …Dish (restaurant review)

When my husband and I lived in San Francisco we loved going to all the restaurant hot spots.  I still like to read about what’s new and up and coming, but we get to those places later and less often (not as many date nights as a family of four).

Now when I hear about a new restaurant or food spot closer to home that may be kid friendly, my radar is peaked.  I felt so current this weekend.  I had seen signs for a new local eatery in Mill Valley called Dish, which was opening to serve breakfast, lunch and dinner.  I was thinking of where to go before the Memorial Day Parade and thought we’d check out the new place.  I even went online and saw the menu.  I was excited about the local, sustainable, organic ingredients and the reasonable prices.  However it was by complete accident that we were the first paying customers to order and sit down.

When we walked in we noticed the chic, yet comfotable urban decor, yummy looking baked goods and bottles of wine above the bar/counter.  My husband and I thought this looked promising and asked how long they’d been open.  The answer was “about 2 hours.  People have been in for coffee and muffins to go, but you are the first to order and sit”.  Wow.  We scooped everyone! 

The menu was limited for the first day, but we all found favorites and sat down to wait for our order with a berry, bran scone.  It was funny how much it tasted like the ones I make at home (perhaps the use of butermilk?).  The kids loved the look of my cappucino with foam “feather”.  Yes, with each bite and look around the room, we were more and more pleased.  Dish is built and operates quite green too.  As we waited for our food and played “eye spy” we noticed reclaimed wood and recycled items everywhere.  So the kids got a bit impatient, but I had to explain this was the first time (well almost) people were cooking in the kitchen, taking orders and bringing food in this space.  I equated it to the first day of school where everyone and everything is new and you have to get used to things.  They understood.  They thought it was pretty cool they were the first people to sit at our table.  I also explained that we liked everything so far and that this could be a favorite spot for us, so we needed to give it a chance and wait.

When we did get our order (with big apologies from the owner), the food was just as we’d hoped – great.  Homemade granola and yogurt with berries for my daughter (notice she got her’s before her brother).  French toast with fruit for my son.  Huevos Rancheros for my husband.  And a leek tart for me.  So while I’m happy to spread the word, and did to all our friends at the parade that day;  I fear my next meal at Dish will begin with waiting in line to get in and I’ll have to explain to my children that someone else is sitting at “our table”.

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Happy Chinese New Year – Beef with Lettuce Cups Recipe

We’d been celebrating Chinese New Year the entire month of February.   Making dishes for other blogs and articles, we had been eating lots of yummy recipes so I could take photographs, like this.  See below for the lettuce cups recipe.

lettuce cups

Of course the grand finale of our Chinese New Year celebration was the actual parade.  This year as the past three, was a spectacle of sights and sounds of dancing dragons, decorative floats, music and firecrackers.

Like year’s past, we arrived early and walked the streest of Chinatown; snacking on a pork bun, buying poppers and sparklers, visiting the pet shop, stopping at the fortune cookie factory and people watching. 

A dried fish stand
I paid 50 cents to take this photo of the factory

Before the parade we had a great dinner of dim sum and seafood.  One of the dishes was a seafood nest.  The nest was potato strings all weaved together like a nest (th seafood sat inside).  I had wanted to take a photo to show you, however the waiter was so quick to break (oh gasp!) and serve the dish, I wasn’t quick enough. 

Ellery and her carrot flower

The evening ended for us a bit early (the parade wasn’t quite over) as the crowd was getting a bit rowdy (more than I remember in the past).  There were many more fireworks and smokebombs in the crowd.  Our ears had heard enough, our bellies were full (we had a custard cup on the walk back to the car) and we were happy to help usher in the year of the tiger.

Yum!

Beef-Filled Lettuce Cups

Lettuce cups are a fun excuse for kids to eat with their hands. If you’re looking for the flavor without the mess, you can simply have children eat the beef mixture out of a bowl with a spoon or fork. This also works as a salad when entertaining by shredding the lettuce and mixing with the beef to be enjoyed with chop sticks out of individual Chinese take-out boxes. For vegetarians substitute diced firm tofu for the beef.

Makes 3 cups beef mixture or 16 to 18 filled lettuce cups

2 teaspoons expeller-pressed canola oil

2 tablespoons minced organic red bell pepper

1 tablespoon minced shallot

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 pound organic lean beef

¼ cup fresh organic mushrooms (portobello, crimini or shiitake), chopped

3 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro leaves

2 teaspoons organic low-sodium tamari

1½ teaspoons ground allspice

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lime juice

16 to 18 organic butter lettuce leaves

2 tablespoons prepared plum sauce (optional)

In a large frying pan or wok, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add bell pepper, shallot, and garlic and stir-fry for 1 minute. Add beef, breaking apart and stirring, until starting to brown, about 5 minutes. Drain off excess fat and liquid from mixture.

            Stir in the mushrooms, cilantro, tamari, allspice, ginger, and lime juice and cook until beef is cooked and mushrooms are tender, about 2 minutes.

            Serve beef mixture in a large bowl alongside lettuce leaves. To eat, spoon beef mixture into leaves then top with ½ teaspoon plum sauce (if using).

Pack Perfectly. To pack and take to a family dinner or pot luck, put beef mixture in one container and layer cold, crisp lettuce leaves in another.

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Final Challenge Day

 

So yesterday was the final day.  Although probably the easiest.  We were so busy, there was not much time for eating.  The days started early, as my son had a 9 a.m. soccer game.  Once again I only finished half my bowl of oatmeal.  We were out of berries, bananas and nectarines, so it was plain.  The kids and my husband finished the last of the granola (there’s a bit left of the Mighty Bites) with milk, and the kids had plain yogurt sweetened with brown sugar and cinnamon.  We all had a quick glass of O.J.

We were headed for miniature golf after the game so I packed a quick lunch/snack of sunflower butter and fruit spread sandwiches, along with some trail mix, and sliced apples (last 2) and cheese.   We also had my son’s friend with us.  Luckily there was enough bread.

Later we went to friends’ to swim.  My kids were offered some snacks of crackers and cheese, grapes, watermelon and grape juice.  It looked good, but I passed and luckily had some apple slices left-over.  I explained about the hunger challenge and they said, but you’re not paying for this.  Seems I could eat what was offered at someone else’s house right?  Then I started to think about all the places you could go and sample food if you wanted.  Even when I shop at Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s there’s usually something to taste and nibble.  In fact sometimes my kids want to go back repeatedly.

Many that I spoke to about the challenge had stories about college or struggling days on their own away from home.  Remembering back, you had a certain amount of money and knew how to budget to feed yourself.  It often meant lots of baked potatoes, spaghetti, PB&J and boxed macaroni and cheese.  And let’s be honest you had to factor in beer.  One friend joked that the beer would be a name brand favorite at the beginning of the month and then get more generic and watery by the end of the month.

So dinner tonight was a kid favorite – breakfast for dinner.  I still had 6 eggs so why not?  If you remember I was just under $99, then I went to the store and bought the fish and tortillas, putting me at about $106.  Well I decided to buy (from my own pantry) a can of pureed pumpkin for $2.29 to make my kid’s favorite pu,pkin pancake recipe.  Getting everything out I realized I wasn’t going to be able to make the usual pumpkin pancake recipe as I needed to use 4 eggs.  Luckily I had created a recipe for a mom who wanted to give her son (who was allergic to eggs) pancakes  and out it my book, The Petit Appetit Cookbook.  Aha!  I will add the pumpkin to get the veggie factor in and please my kids, to the “no yolking around pancakes” recipe. (see my new recipe below).   I made a double batch which makes quite a few.  Left-overs will be welcome as a lunchbox snack or a quick re-heat for breakfast. 

While these are rib stickers I also wanted to make eggs.  Thinking of TopChef, I made eggs two ways.  One way was over easy, my son’s favorite.  While the other was a simple omelet with cheese (one thing I still have plenty of), my daughter’s fav.  A typical breakfast for dinner night would also have turkey bacon, but not tonight.  That’s was o.k.  We were all so tired from the day’s activities, no one missed it. 

Pumpkin “No Yolking Around Pancakes”

 Makes about 15 (5-inch) pancakes

 2 cup organic wheat flour

2 tablespoon organic cane sugar

1 Tablespoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 1/2 cups organic milk

1 tablespoon expeller pressed canola oil

1/4 cup canned pumpkin puree 

In a medium mixing bowl, stir together flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, baking soda and cinnamon. 

In a separate bowl, whisk together milk and oil. 

Add milk mixture to flour mixture all at once.  Stir with a rubber spatula until just blended.  If batter is too thick, thin with milk.

Heat a large non-stick skillet or griddle over medium heat.  Lightly grease skillet with cooking spray or melted butter. 

For each pancake, pour about 1/4 cup batter onto hot griddle or skillet.  Cook until bubbles form on top of pancakes and bottoms are golden and set.  Flip with spatula and brown other sides until golden.   Warm finished pancakes in a 300 F oven, while continuing to use batter to make more batches.

 

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Fish Taco Night!

tacos 008
my son's fish taco creation

I did it.  I went to the store and thankfully I was able to buy some fish.  At Whole Foods, there was a sale on Dover Sole for $5.99 a pound.  This is a thin fish, so 4 fillets came in at about 2/3 of a pound or $3.29.  I had to rethink my idea of stir fry and the chinese noodles.  I just can’t do noodles again.  So I factored in the cabbage, cheese (I still have cheddar), black beans, and onion and came up with fish tacos.  I was missing tortillas, but figured I had enough cushion (remember I only spent $95 and change) and bought those for $2.99.

This meal was a real treat after the heavy dinners I had been making.  And it looks like a lot, since there’s many dishes of individual things (shredded cheese, cabbage, diced onion, beans).  Tacos are always so great because everyone can make their own choices and participate.  Without holding back some of my budget, I wouldn’t have been able to alter my meal plan.  I was worried if I went into the store another day during the week, I would buy too many other items.  I did buy a few more, but told myself and kids we couldn’t eat them until next week.  I realize that through this challenge I need to go to the store less often.  Out of sight out of mind.  Instead of waiting until we run out of something or we only have 2 kinds of cereal (and not the usual 4 or 5), I go out and rebuy, along with other things. 

Tonight I even got creative with a bit of dessert and made sugar-cinnamon tortilla crisps.  So easy and the kids love them.  Simply cut desired shapes in tortilla with a cookie cutter.  Don’t toss the scraps (those make tasty/funny crisps too).  Place on a baking sheet lined with foil and brush with melted butter.  Sprinkle a mixture of sugar and cinnamon (we keep some handy in a shaker) and bake in a 375 oven for about 8 minutes (turning half-way through) until browned and crisp.

sweet tortilla crisps
photo before baking

I also used more of the watermelon and feta for my salad again.  And there was the rest of the broccoli which I roasted in the oven with olive oil and rosemary salt.

Let’s get to one of my addictions…rosemary salt.  This perks up everything – roasted veggies, potatoes, meats, dressings, etc.  We get it at the farmer’s market or order it online at Eatwell Farms.  I realize that while I only use a bit at each meal, this would be a cash layout of $8 for a jar.  Kind of a luxury given the hunger challenge.  You’d have to give up something one week to have this (althugh for a while).  For me it would be worth it.  Even if you couldn’t do the rosemary salt, a sea salt is so much better and smoother than traditional Morton salts, and not so salty.  A big shaker is worth the extra money, say $3.50 vs. $1.00(?) for Morton.

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Breakfast for Dinner (with Organic Yogurt Pancakes For Kids Recipe)

From Lisa Barnes

Before we were parents my husband and I would sometimes skip dinner (both had a big lunch, out) or just have a glass of wine with a baguette and some yummy cheese. My roommate in college sometimes had a bowl of ice cream for dinner. And I meet plenty of new parents who are intimidated to cook for their children in the first place because their own dinners are often eating take out meals standing in the kitchen.

But once you have kids that are old enough to eat your food and hear your philosophy about healthy meals and eating habits, that freedom is lost. It’s not that you want to revert back to some poor eating habits all the time, but maybe once a month or year. It just doesn’t happen – kids want and need a meal. Plus you are the one cooking it and setting a good example.

If you’re a parent who’s tired of coming up with creative ideas for your family dinner together…take a break. Be a hero and announce to your kids you’re having “breakfast for dinner”. This usually is welcomed with squeals of delight. I’m not advocating a cereal dinner (although I know a few parents who have that on the rotation for those really difficult days) but how about family favorites you only make on the weekends such as pancakes or a cheesy omelet (which also happens to make great use of left-over veggies and meat)?.

My kids and I (Dad was out) had these pancakes tonight with an impromptu veggie cheese omelet and side of fruit and everyone was happy.

Organic Yogurt Pancakes

1 cage free organic egg, slightly beaten
2/3 cup organic yogurt – plain or favorite flavor*
2/3 cup organic milk or soy milk
3/4 cup organic unbleached all purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
Expeller pressed canola oil to prevent sticking

In a medium bowl, mix together egg and yogurt until smooth. Add milk, flour and salt. Mix until batter is smooth. If batter is too thin, add more flour.

Heat skillet over medium heat. Spray cooking oil in bottom of skillet, or drizzle enough oil to lightly coat the pan. When oil is hot and sizzles, drop quarter cup fulls of batter into pan. Leave enough room around each heart to turn easily. Cook one to two minutes and watch for bubbles to form on the surface before flipping with a spatula. Cook another one to two minutes on other side until cooked through, and lightly browned on each side.

Top with fresh organic berries, yogurt and/or maple syrup.

Makes 10, four inch pancakes.

*If you choose a flavored yogurt such as strawberry or raspberry, the batter will take on a bit of color. Pancakes will also be sweeter than using plain yogurt.

~
See also Lisa’s No Yolking Around – Organic Pancakes for Kids Recipe
~~
Lisa Barnes is author of The Petit Appetit Cookbook: Easy, Organic Recipes to Nurture Your Baby and Toddler and lives in Sausalito, California.
Image Credit: Runaway Pancake (a Rand McNally Junior Elf Book), Ben Williams 1956
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