Day 5 – Hunger Challenge

son's breakfast - note: the last piece of toast

I feel bored writing about our mornings, there’s so much of the same.  Oatmeal with almond milk and half a banana for me.  My daughter shared some oatmeal and a few slices of apple and grapes.  She put up a little fuss at breakfast.  My son got up earlier and ate the last piece of toast (along with yogurt, aple and a bowl of cereal).  I imagine this would be a regular problem in a large family, but it doesn’t happen much with only two kids.  Even the bread heel wasn’t an option as I used it for my tuna melt the other night, knowing no one else would want it.  We usually put the ends in the freezer to have on hand when we feed ducks at the park.

son's lunch, again
daughter's lunch
my lunch

While I was making my son’s lunch – he just keeps requesting the same turkey wrap, carrots, pretzels and grapes –  I decided to make a few hard boiled eggs.  My daughter loves making egg salad face sandwiches and I thought she’d like that for lunch with me.  I even went to the store and used up close to the last of my money (bread, carrots, flatbread, avocado, tofu, chicken, tortillas).   But no, she didn’t want that.  I enjoyed my sandwich – with no face.  She said “Why didn’t you make a face?”  I said “Because if you don’t have one there’e no one for my face to talk with.”  She had sunflowerbutter and fruit spread wrap, carrots and grapes.  There was one addition.  Cucumber slices.  The garden mom gave it to us at school pick up.  Score!

 

The afterschool snack was not exciting as we had 15 minutes to unpack bags, eat something, fill water bottles and change for soccer practice (both kids).  They had a Clif Z bar, as did their coach dad.  They hadn’t had one in a while and I keep them on hand for hiking or an emergency snack at a sports game/practice.  So this seemed like a treat.  My son remembered he didn’t eat his pretzels at lunch, so he packed them up for after soccer.  He’s now being resourceful and planning against hunger.

 

So I was glad I was able to buy more things today.  It wasn’t much, but staples we ran out of and a few things to get us through dinners.  I went to Trader Joes’ again, eventhough I usually buy meat, fish, chicken at Whole Foods.  It’s too too expensive for the challenge for these items.  I did still buy organic.  I also was happy to see the product demo for a taste of blueberry pancake with syrup.  I could’ve eaten 10 more samples, but I stopped at one.

dad's dinner
daughter's dinner - no meat, no sauce

Tonight was a stir fry.  A stir fry is great because you can add anything.  It’s also a good way to use all your veggies.  It seemed a treat to have two proteins – tofu (1/2 package) and chicken (2 small breasts, less than 3/4 lb total).  (My diet is lacking protein this week)  It also didn’t contain any left-overs or make-overs from previous meals.  My daughter not eating meat of course.  My son wanting chicken and my husband and I having both.  I had “bought” rice from my pantry, which wasn’t great planning.  There was only a little left of brown and the same of jasmine.  So I made a mix to get 1 cup and cooked it together.  This is one drawback to having too many choices – partial bags, but maybe not enough.  This meal was easy…First I heated some oil in the wok.  I rinsed and pushed out the water from the tofu and cut into chunks, then added it to the wok.  I removed the tofu and stir fried the chicken pieces.   I removed the chicken then for veggies I woked up some broccoli, carrots, and kale in some vegetable broth.  Everyone could add the veggies to the rice with their tofu and/or chicken.  I had bought a premade thai curry sauce for flavor, that we buy anyway.  It’s great for quick mid week stir fry, without having to measure and use lots of ingredients (which I don’t have access to this week).

edanamme

I also boiled some frozen organic edaname.  Half of which my daughter ate before dinner.  It’s hard this week to offer enough veggies for them to snack on before dinner, and be able to use them for the main meal.  It was good and we were full.  I even packed up the left-overs – a single serving, just barely big enough for my lunch tomorrow.  Something to look forward to…

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Chicken Apple Bite Review on Doof-a-Palooza

I’ve had a few guest bloggers, but no one under 21 years old, has ever written a review of my food.   This was so exciting to see this post from a friend of mine’s daughter, Jenny, age 14 (unsolicited even).  I’ve told you about her mom, Elaine Smith.  She’s the founder of ChowBella Kids cooking events for kids.  Well her daughter is on her way to being a food connossieur, blogger and instructor too.  Check out her making my recipe for Chicken Apple Bites here…http://www.foodbackwards.com/2011/05/14/yummy-chicken-apple-bites/

Note this was on the Doof-A-Palooza website.  Doof is food spelled backwards, and  teaches kids the amazing journey of food from its source to their table, with an interactive, imaginative, sometimes messy and always hands-on experience.  The Doof food festival in the Bay Area is this Sunday May 22nd, from 10 – 5pm at Jack London Square.  While I do not have a booth this year (just too many family commitments), I know this will be a fun time for all ages who come out to play with and sample food from local growers, chefs, purveyors, culinary instructors, authors and restaurants.  Learn event deatils here…

 

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Dad’s Magic Chicken

My 4 1/2 year old hasn’t eaten chicken in 4 or 5 months.  She says she doesn’t like the flavor, although I think it’s more a texture thing.  She didn’t eat much turkey at Thanksgiving either.  Or maybe it’s because she adores her aunt, who is vegan.  She loves to ask “Can TT (Aunt Christy) eat ______?”  The other day is was “Can TT eat snow?”  Although when she says she’s vegan like her aunt, her brother is quick to remind her of all the lamb with mint jelly she likes to eat.

As you probably imagine, I do most of the cooking at our house.  Although my husband does most breakfasts (including weekend pancakes and waffles) and all outdoor cooking.  When the weather is nice you’ll find me inside as sous chef:  making side dishes and prepping veggies and meats for my husband to grill outside.  However sometimes my husband doesn’t wait for the weather to turn warm.  Last weekend he decided to make a new recipe for chicken from the How to Grill Cookbook.   We tried to remember the last time he made a new recipe from a book or even cracked this book (he’s had it about 7 or 8 years).  I was poking fun of him and told the kids he was making “Magic Chicken”.  It got them excited and it was such a hit, my daughter not only tried and loved it, but asked for more.  So much for her vegan ways (this week).  There’s always a tinge of jealousy from mom when dad comes in and makes a great meal (once a month) and gets lots of kudos.  (My son even said “This is the best chicken I’ve ever had!”).  I must admit it really was good.  Now I’m trying to come up with a “mom’s magic” something recipe to compete.  Or maybe I’ll step aside more meals, and suggest dad make more magic.

Dad’s Magic Chicken Marinade

(aka Chicken with Walnut Dill Pesto from How to Grill by Steven Raichlen)

makes enough for 6 – 8 pounds of chicken

1 bunch fresh dill, washed stemmed and chopped

1 bunch basil, washed, stemmed and chopped

5 cloves garlic, chopped

1/2 cup walnut pieces

1/2 cup freshly grated romano cheese

2 strips lemon zest (1/2 by 2 inches)

1 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/4 cup lemon juice

1 teaspoon each coarse salt and black pepper, or more to taste

Place the dill, basil, garlic, walnut, cheese, and zest in food processor and process until very finely chopped.  With the machine running add the oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper and 3/4 cup water.  Taste for seasoning (it should be highly seasoned). 

Marinate chicken for 2 hours or up to 12 hours, turning once or twice.  The longer the chicken marinates the richer the flavor.  Grill or cook marinated chicken as desired.

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