Holidays, Cold and Flu Are Here…Tea to the Rescue

Last year we got the flu just before Thanksgiving.  This year it was literally on the drive home from my parents.  Thanksgiving dinner was great as was the visit, but the drive home made us not want to think about doing it for a very long time.  Long story short my poor son got sick in the car and we ended up having to stay in a motel on I5 just outside the Grapevine where he was up all night with the flu.  The next day we were finally able to drive home – my son sleeping most of the way.

It would be two days later when my daughter got it (although a milder version).  And now my husband and I both have colds.  There is one thing that seems to be soothing whether healthy or sick during these cooler months for all ages and that is tea.  You know about my love of iced tea, but hot’s great too.  My kids love tea with a touch of honey.  My pediatrician’s nurse actually suggested it as a remedy for coughs rather than medicine. (But never for those under 1 year.).  This time of year we stock up on peppermint tea which you can only get in winter.  But we also have a large variety of everything from cammomile to ginger to mint to chai to fit everyone’s mood and illness.  Tea is the most popular drink in the world – so there must be something there.

Mint Chamomile Tea

A cup of chamomile tea can be soothing for a child on a cold day or with a cold inside. The added mint syrup lends a bit of sweet and spice. Most children don’t like drinks and food too hot. Keep temperature on warm or lukewarm.

Makes 1 cup

 

1 cup water

1 bag chamomile tea

2 teaspoons Mint Syrup (see below)

Bring water to a boil
in a saucepan. Add tea bag and let steep for 3 to 5 minutes. Carefully squeeze
tea bag and discard. Add syrup and stir.

 

Mint Syrup

The symbol of hospitality, mint has been used for scores of culinary and medicinal purposes over the centuries. This simple mint syrup can be added as a sweetener to hot
and cold teas, as well as lemonade and plain water.

Makes 2 cups syrup

 

¾ cup turbinado sugar

2 cups water

2 cups fresh mint (1 bunch), torn into 2-inch pieces

In a small saucepan, combine sugar, water, and mint. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until sugar has dissolved, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and let stand for at least 30 minutes.

Pour though a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl or pitcher and discard mint.

Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.

 

 

 

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I Heart Iced Tea

Yesterday was National Iced Tea Day.  Although you probably already knew that right?  I celebrated with a glass of iced tea.  Actually whether it’s a holiday or not, I drink a glass or two of iced tea.  There’s not a lot of beverages I drink.  My mainstays are water and iced tea.  I’m not big on bubbles.  I no longer drink coffee.  So tea, cold or hot is my drink.  Apparently this is true for many people, as tea is the most popular drink, worldwide.

Whether you brew it from a tea bag, buy a bottle or order at a restaurant – there are lots of options.  What kind of tea?  Is it caffeinated?  Plus there are the sweeteners to consider.  Watch out…  Many bottled versions have high fructose corn syrup.  Or there’s the fake sweeteners that are full of chemicals.  And you never know what you’ll get in a restaurant – Lipton, Nestea, fresh brewed, flavored, etc.

These are a few of my favorite iced teas…

My first is the Mighty Leaf, African Nectar.  This is good both hot and cold, but the first time I had the cold was at the Nob Hill Spa.  Brewing this at home or ordering it out (they also brew it at La Boulange) reminds me of my annual stress free day at the spa.  Mighty Leaf makes all kinds of teas in bag, loose leaf and iced tea forms in a huge variety of flavors.

My next favorite is Honest Tea’s Oo-la-Long Peach.  Honest Tea makes quite a few flavors and uses red, green, white and black teas, but this is my favorite.  Just enough sweetness and no chemical taste.

Finally our staple at home (my husband is an iced tea guy too) is Tejava.  This is bottled, plain black tea without sweetener.  This is good all on it’s own.  We stock up on the big bottles.

I have a few iced tea recipes in my book, Petit Appetit: Eat, Drink and Be Merry.  The antioxidants in many teas, hot or cold, can benefit everyone.  Just be sure to make decaf for the kids.  Adding a slice of lemon or orange makes it extra special.  The best way to sweeten iced tea is with simple syrup, as it mixes well with the cold liquid.  Granular sugar just adds grains without flavor. (My friends who endure my “iced tea with a splash of simple syrup” order at restaurants will attest for me).  Below is a recipe for a mint simple syrup that is a refreshing addition to hot and cold teas.

 

Minty Iced Green Tea

This is the standard and favorite “iced tea” in my family’s refrigerator. The mint syrup sweetens the sometimes bitterness of green tea. Despite the name this tea will not be green in color, much to my son’s dismay.
Yield 4½ cups

4 cups water

4 bags green tea

½ cup Mint Syrup (see below)

Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Remove from heat and add tea bags, cover, and let steep for 5 minutes. Carefully squeeze tea bags and discard. Let cool.

 

Pour tea into a glass pitcher and add syrup. Serve over ice.

 

Mint Syrup

The symbol of hospitality, mint has been used for scores of culinary and medicinal purposes over the centuries. This simple mint syrup can be added as a sweetener to hot and cold teas, as well as lemonade and plain water (see below)
Makes 2 cups syrup

3/4 cup turbinado (raw) sugar

2 cups water

2 cups fresh mint (1 bunch), torn into 2-inch pieces
In a small saucepan, combine sugar, water, and mint. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until sugar has dissolved, about 1 minute. Remove from heat and let stand for at least 30 minutes.

Pour though a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl or pitcher and discard mint.

Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.

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